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Labor wants to tie the British closer to the EU

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Labor leader Keir Starmer – who voted for continued EU membership in 2016 – is well ahead of the polls ahead of the election to be held in the UK no later than January next year. If he becomes prime minister, it will probably mean a foreign policy with closer cooperation with the EU. Photo: Victoria Jones / PA / AP / NTB

Of NTB | 17.05.2024 20:19:39

Policy: – The next election is an opportunity to move on after the bad mood in the wake of Brexit. I will resume the structured dialogue with the EU on the important issues, says David Lammy about Labour’s foreign policy goals.

Lammy is set to become British foreign minister if Labor wins the general election, which must be held no later than 28 January next year.

The Tories have ruled Britain since 2010, through the ill-fated referendum and the sometimes chaotic Brexit process. The political mood points to a shift the next time voters go to the polls.

For the past year and a half, Labor has had a double-digit lead in the polls. Thus, Remain voter Keir Starmer can replace Brexit voter Rishi Sunak as Prime Minister.

– It will promote closer cooperation on a number of issues in defence, economy, climate, health, cyber and energy security, Lammy recently wrote in the journal Foreign Affairs.

There he added that this should complement “the unwavering commitment to NATO”, which both parties support. He also said that Britain should invest even more in its close relationship with France, Germany, Ireland and Poland. It includes a defense agreement with Germany similar to the one Britain has had with France since 2010.

But Brexit is still a hot topic in British politics, and Labor has ruled out a return to the EU’s single market, customs union or freedom of movement after a possible change of power.

– That is part of what we want to discuss, he says.

After Brexit, the UK has, among other things, withdrawn from the EU’s student exchange program Erasmus and instead proposed a global alternative.

Central to Labour’s plans is a security pact they want to enter into with the EU.

Lammy suggests that a scheme the EU recently proposed to ensure freedom of movement for young Britons aged 18-30 could become part of the future relationship with the Union.

(© NTB)

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